Contemplating the Meaning of Resurrection

Originally posted April 13, 2009 at Gaia.com

With the Easter season, naturally my thoughts have turned to the idea of rebirth and regeneration.  It’s always seemed to me that the point of Jesus’s resurrection, assuming that it actually happened in a physical sense, was not to prove that he was God, and not to wipe away some original sinfulness that I do not believe humans possess.  It was to show that humans, all of us, are not fundamentally material, mortal beings.  Jesus was acting as an example of what we can all become.  He was one of us.

In the fall of 2007 I had an earth-shattering experience of contact with this great being, mediated by a friend who channels him.  Although I had had small contacts with him before, intimations of what he might be and what might be possible, I struggled to understand what happened that evening, how I could fit it into the rest of the framework of my life.  To that end, I wrote an article for that winter’s issue of The Searchlight, which I’m afraid contained more questions than answers.  Here is an excerpt:

“What if Jesus was “only” a human being, albeit a very special one?  (I say “only” because even the most limited of human beings are far larger than we realize.)  Hearing from him is still not such a big surprise.  We know that humans who have died still live in some way, somewhere, and that they can communicate with those still on the Earth.  If Jesus ever lived as a human being, then he still lives, and even if he were no more than an ordinary person, he could potentially speak to us in the present.  But what if he never lived here with us, and the story we have been given is only legend and metaphor?  Sometimes I wonder if we ourselves create our deities, if our concentration on them and love for them brings them into existence out of nothing.  Then, I think, this is a moot point, because ALL of us are essentially invented out of nothing.  Where do our own personalities and individual identities come from, anyway?  It’s really the same question.  It’s all one thing, all mind, all God, showing myriad faces everywhere, contemplating itself and its works.”

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