Tag Archives: gender issues

Some Strong Words about Strong Words

effin-sale

One can hardly blame the folks at this store in Osaka who thought these signs were in perfect contemporary English.

Have you noticed that we need a whole new set of cuss words? The old ones have been neutered by constant exposure and are now pretty much useless.

In particular I speak of the venerable F-word, now so completely defanged that one may use it in front of one’s grandmother without even noticing. (Though the grandmother is likely to notice still.) It’s so ubiquitous that at times I wonder if anyone remembers how to use any other words at all.

I’ve noticed, in some internet interactions that were both amusing and annoying, that if someone complains about being constantly effed on, they are instantly jumped all over and told to eff off because they have failed to understand the subtle and subversive meaning that is intended, and they’ve totally missed the point. Whereas they may simply have found the writing ugly. I’ve certainly had that reaction. There’s not much of a subversive effect left anyway.

I was just visiting the fun pop-science website www.iflscience.com.  The full name, used on their Facebook page, is “I fucking love science,” which makes me feel a little bit embarrassed when I share their posts.  I noticed that their Twitter handle is @IFeakingLoveScience, though, and the section of their site where they sell things is the “I Love Science Store.”  So I suppose they are not entirely comfortable with That Word, either?  (I was unable to find any rules on Twitter that say you can’t use the F-word in your name, but perhaps that’s the case?)

The amount of effing on John Oliver’s show mystifies me. Oliver and the Last Week Tonight writers are surely persons of wide vocabulary. They don’t need to repeat the same word over and over; they have plenty more to choose from. Yet it seems like almost the only adjective used on the show is “fucking.” It gets old. I don’t understand why such a clever, insightful, educated bunch of people must use such monotone speech.

And that is my main complaint. I’m not making a moral judgment. I would like to preserve the ability of the strongest words to add seasoning to our language. Cuss words are known as “salty” language, right? Well, constant effing is like having every meal drenched in the hottest chile. There’s no variety, and one becomes numb.

Where can one go, these days, to add emphasis, outrage, or shock value? When the most shocking word can no longer shock, what is left? Do you have any candidates for a possible next Very Most Shocking Word?

And why is the very “worst” word one that signifies one of the very best things?

What do you think?
*******************************************************

I wrote the above a while back, and then Pussygate* occurred. Apparently the capacity to be shocked still exists. The term usually shows up only as p***y or the like in print, and now seems to be a contender for the top Shocking Word. Of course, this was not merely a matter of the word used— the word was a description of a heinous and criminal action that had been done to real women. (The objective meaning of the noun itself, again, is something quite positive.)

Even a small child can easily figure out that this is not the way to speak or act.  Colin Farrell, the actor, reported on his 7-year-old son’s sadly hilarious reaction: “Now he can’t stand Trump because I had to explain to him why [he] keeps on being mean to kittens. He just keeps grabbing those kittens.” It seems that Henry can’t understand why people are being so mean to other people, either. He knows it doesn’t have to be that way.

In a powerful speech last week, Michelle Obama mentioned another little boy who took exception to the use of coarse language by a certain candidate. She quoted the boy as saying (as nearly as I remember it), “He called someone a piggy. You can’t be president if you call someone a piggy.”

I suppose these young men will become jaded and contaminated in the not too distant future, but at least for now they are wise, and they give me hope. Let’s remember what we all learned in kindergarten. Surely we can bring the level of our public discourse up at least a couple of notches from the deep trench it’s fallen into. I am fucking determined to try.

 

* For those reading in the future when this wretched election season is mercifully forgotten, Donald Trump was revealed to have spoken enthusiastically about assaulting women, using the P-word in a particularly disgraceful way.

 

http://www.japansubculture.com/its-no-ordinary-sale-its-a-fuckin-sale/

https://www.yahoo.com/news/colin-farrells-7-year-old-son-dislikes-donald-trump-because-he-keeps-grabbing-those-kittens-173035282.html

http://www.rolereboot.org/family/details/2016-07-im-not-going-stop-swearing-front-daughter/

http://the-toast.net/2014/12/09/linguist-explains-syntax-f-word/
https://solongasitswords.wordpress.com/2014/02/12/on-the-origin-of-fuck/

2 Comments

Filed under politics

Another Human Being’s Identity Is Not Yours to Dictate

(Rant Advisory! I am as upset about this as if it pertained to my own child, or to me.)

So very often I am reminded of the old song that goes “None of us are free if one of us is chained.” It adds, “And if we don’t say it’s wrong then that says it’s right.”

Sometimes the chains are kept locked by those who think of themselves as far beyond bigotry or intolerance.

In the past week I have encountered two attacks against transgender people that appeared on the surface to have some higher intention. Both were warmed-over versions of old arguments.  One came in the form of a supposedly spiritual look at gender identity through the lens of reincarnation, and the other purported to be a principled defense of the rights of women by a feminist group.

GIVE. ME. A. BREAK.

I could call out the “spiritual” thinker by name, but I’m not going to, because his presentation is not just his own but represents a turn of thought that is all too common. It’s been used against gay people, too. The idea is that if you are not comfortable twisting yourself to fit into a gender-binary, heteronormative life, it’s because you were a different gender in a previous life, and either through confusion or through willful stubbornness, you are still clinging to identification with that gender. If you persist, you are stupid and bad. You should just get over it and move on, and then you’ll be fine.

This is the exact same paternalistic crap promulgated by religious groups who insist that God made you either male or female and that’s that. God doesn’t make mistakes, and so if you don’t feel right in your body, you are going against God, and therefore you are sinful and bad.

I’ll get to the so-called feminists later. First, I want to take a look at exactly what God/nature/biology did make. Because we do have some actual facts to work with.

While it would be nice to have human reproductive biology all wrapped up in a neat, understandable package, the more we learn, the more we see that things are complex and fuzzy. “Male” and “female” are not definite categories with hard edges. I’m sorry if someone dislikes this, but it’s reality. Some easily accessible sources of information follow.

http://www.isna.org/faq/ten_myths/rare
According to this, about 1 in 2000 humans are intersex. Another source estimated 1.7% of births. That’s a lot of people. Some may never realize they are anything but typical male or female, or may only find out late in life. One person I’ve read about was a seemingly ordinary middle-aged man with a bunch of kids, who had an abdominal surgery and was found to have a uterus in addition to his full set of male reproductive parts.

https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001669.htm
There are a variety of possible intersex conditions, with varying appearances and health considerations, briefly summarized in this article.

If that’s not enough, take a look at the fascinating case of the guevedoces. A few weeks ago I learned about them in an excellent PBS program, Nine Months that Made You. In the Dominican Republic, about one in 90 boys have this condition, which has also been found in Papua New Guinea. They have XY genotypes like “regular” boys, but they lack an enzyme that is needed to develop male genitalia in the womb, so their parents think they are girls and raise them that way. At puberty, they have the usual surge in testosterone and become obviously male all of a sudden. Of course, they were biologically male all along.
http://www.pbs.org/show/9-months-made-you/
http://www.newsweek.com/rare-condition-causes-girls-become-boys-puberty-374934

So are we clear now that external genital configuration does not equal gender? Likely we’re not clear at all and I’m still going to get a big argument from those who insist on a binary world, but in that case, they’re going to have to register their objections with God, because this is the way nature is put together. A religious and/or spiritual viewpoint, it seems to me, would have to say that there must be a good reason for things to be this way. A purely materialist viewpoint would say the same— that nature has shaped human bodies and brains in a dazzlingly diverse variety because it’s been helpful to our survival.

Some might then point out that transgender people are not the same as intersex people, and that most probably have clear male or female genotypes or phenotypes. But there appear to be differences from cisgender folk in those cases too, albeit subtler ones. As far as we can tell, transgender people have brains that function more like the gender they say they are rather than the one indicated by their genital apparatus— though this too is complex and a bit fuzzy.
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/is-there-something-unique-about-the-transgender-brain/

Here is a link to another useful PBS program.
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/film/growing-up-trans/
What struck me most about it was that the kids decidedly look like the gender they say they are. That’s not a hard scientific fact, but to me, it reinforces the concept that there is a physical basis for being transgender.

I don’t pretend to understand much about these aspects of our biology, nor how they fit with how we become who we become when we enter a new life on this planet, or what choices we have or don’t have about our embodiment. My conjecture is that gender exists as a spectrum so that we can experience every permutation of it, but that’s not fact. What I know for sure is that it makes no sense to tell others how they feel inside themselves— either how they do feel or how they should feel. It’s illogical and it’s just plain mean. And when it’s coupled with a holier-than-thou or more-enlightened-than-thou message, it’s positively sickening.

Now, to the lawsuit filed by the Women’s Liberation Front, or WoLF. It’s the bathroom thing again, same as the extreme right’s fearmongering, strangely enough. They are insisting that “men” in women’s restrooms are a threat to women’s safety. I’m not going to rehash the reasons why trans women are no threat to cis women in this context (or anywhere else, really). You can find those all over. I’m only going to point out that trans women are not men. In their brains, the part of the human body that matters most, they are women. So denying ordinary human rights to those women cannot be feminism. Not in any way I can recognize it.

The latest post on WoLF’s Facebook page, in reference to the rule allowing kids to use school facilities consistent with their gender, states: “Girls’ rights to personal privacy and freedom from male sexual harassment, forced exposure to male nudity, and voyeurism have been eliminated with the stroke of a pen.” This makes my stomach churn. I am of course not a trans girl trying to navigate high school (which is hard enough for the rest of us), but reading this, I can viscerally relate to what they experience. It is terrifying. To be just a kid and know that others assume you are a sexual predator, when all you want to do is attend PE class and not get beaten up… to be hated and censured by “righteous” people one has never met… it boggles the mind and even more the heart. Imagine being, say, a second grader, too young even to have a concept of voyeurism or anything like it, having no idea why people are saying these terrible things about you.

(Please note that I don’t mean to ignore trans boys.  It’s just that WoLF seems to be targeting trans girls and women specifically.)

WoLF’s lawsuit clearly contradicts two of their main stated goals, and they seem to have no clue that this is the case. The home page of their website says: “WoLF is a radical feminist organization dedicated to the total liberation of women. We fight to end male violence, regain reproductive sovereignty, and ultimately dismantle the gender-caste system.” The total liberation of women has to include ALL women, not just the ones who look a certain way. Dismantling the gender-caste system (a laudable goal) has to mean completely dismantling, so that no gender is discriminated against.

Why should we settle for anything less?

 

It’s a great song:
http://www.altheaknight.com/None-of-us-is-free-if-one-of-us-is-chained
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JC2mmeA9CA8

7 Comments

Filed under health and healing, human rights, nature, politics, sexuality

Identity and the True Self

By Mike Luckovich. http://www.gocomics.com/mikeluckovich/2015/06/02 (I did my best to look into getting permission to use this cartoon, but could not find out how. Go Comics does allow free sharing on Facebook etc., so I hope this is OK.)

 

 

So much has happened in the past couple of weeks! Looking at the news optimistically, despite the horrifying attacks that have occurred, I see tremendous opportunities for healing in the national conversations about race, gender, and sexual orientation. That is, the fact that we’re having the conversations at all is extremely positive.

I usually try not to jump into any of the rings of the media circus. I am way behind the news cycle with this post, because I’ve been cogitating for quite a while about what I want to say. All the headlines lately have to do with identity in one way or another, and that’s my subject today. It’s complicated, as you know, and I’m afraid that someone may come away from reading this feeling insulted or minimized, which is certainly not my intention.

I started on this back at the time earlier in June, which seems like ages ago, when everyone was talking about Caitlynn Jenner and Rachel Dolezal,* and we were endlessly treated to analyses of those two cases of identity change. I don’t normally pay any attention to celebrities-for-celebrity’s-sake; it wasn’t that long ago that someone had to explain to me who Kim Kardashian was, and I wasn’t clear how Jenner was related. (Argus Hamilton quipped that before Dolezal identified as black, she identified as a Kardashian-American.) But there has been some real usefulness in the confusion people have been expressing and in their attempts to work their way through it.

It seems like the group mind has concluded that it’s pretty much OK to change your appearance and who you say you are in order to fit with who you feel you are on the inside, but that it’s not OK to lie. That’s fairly simple. There’s nothing simple about identity, though.

The fact that same-sex marriage is now legal and recognized in all 50 states (Lord, what fun it is to type those words!) is one sign that our view of human identity is more flexible and tolerant than it used to be. The lowering of the army of northern Virginia’s battle flag in some Southern states is another. The burning of African-American churches—six of them in four states in just the past week— following the murders at the church in Charleston is a sobering sign that the opposite is still true.** We have a long, long way to go.

From a biological viewpoint, race is nonexistent, and gender is fuzzy. Each of us contains multiple lines of ancestors and multiple genetic potentials. Why shouldn’t identity be large enough to contain those multitudes? I am so accustomed to switching roles in the course of a day or a week that it’s hard to imagine being limited to existing as any one thing. I wonder if we can or will get to a point where being intentionally multiple will be seen as normal.

In the matter of race, it seems inevitable; there are more and more mixed-race people all the time (all of us are mixed-race, of course, but I mean those for whom it’s an overt identity), so surely everyone will get more and more used to that. Genetic studies have shown how closely everyone on the planet is related, and that fact will most likely become more widely known.

With regard to gender, I wonder what would happen if our concepts of male and female expanded enough that a boy who feels like a girl could be comfortable remaining identified as a boy while expressing feminine aspects without restriction. That is, I wonder if trans people would feel less pain and less need to transition if society got over the idea of gender being binary and opened up the possibilities. But I am fortunate in that my own identity is not painful and is not being forced on me in any way, and I cannot speak for anyone else.

I read an impassioned essay from June 9 by Fr. Robert Barron, who strongly criticized trans people for saying that they are mentally one thing and physically another.+ He wrote that the Church has always seen the material body as good (which doesn’t sound to me like the Catholic Church I was brought up in), with identity being a characteristic of the body and not just the mind. “Moreover, the mind or will is not the ‘true self’ standing over and against the body; rather, the body, with its distinctive form, intelligibility, and finality, is an essential constituent of the true self.”

Since I am very much aware of the existence of human beings who are not currently living in bodies, I find this point of view astonishing. I wonder what in form Fr. Barron imagines humans to exist in his version of heaven, where physical bodies must be irrelevant. I don’t mean to say that the mind should be set against the body, but it is clear that the body cannot be the “true self.”

Speaking of a council that was apparently convened in Rome the week before, he said that he was particularly bothered by “the claim that the secret council was calling for a ‘theology of love’ that would supplant the theology of the body proposed by John Paul II.++” Christians espousing a theology of love? Shocking! Certainly no basis in the New Testament. No idea where they could have gotten such stuff.

If I had the chance to converse with Fr. Barron, I might ask him how his body-centered spirituality deals with the fact that the body is always changing and does not have “distinctive form” or “finality.” The many, shall we say, gifts of middle age put this fact in front of me every day. For example, my vocal range has changed enough to cause a new label to be applied to my voice, one that feels like it doesn’t belong to me, and I am trying to gracefully let go of the old one. It would be silly to get overly involved with concepts of having to sound a certain way or having a certain hair color or even being a certain height, because those are going to be different, and sooner rather than later. My mother, at age 90 1/2, has been expressing surprise that her body is changing so quickly and dramatically. My elderly patients and friends often say things like that, but add that they feel exactly the same on the inside as they always did.

On the spiritual level, none of our outer identifiers, the things other people see when they look at us, have any real meaning at all. I don’t have to tell you that body shape, size, color and the like are not who you really are. But let’s go a bit further. Some philosophers say that there is no “real you” at all.

Brian Hubbard, husband of Lynne McTaggart, wrote the book Time-Light, describing his theory that what we think of as our personality is nothing more than an accumulation of experiences we have not sufficiently understood, that stick to us and make us “time-heavy.” He claims that he got over his persistent depression by letting go of the past and returning to a state much like that of a small child.

Brent Phillips, a healer and teacher whose work I encountered a few months ago, is one who insists that the you that manifests in the physical world is only a kind of fictional character— he likes to use Harry Potter as the example. When you look further and further inward, he says, you find that “no one is home.”

I have been very uncomfortable with this concept that there is nothing and no one at the center of a person. Not because I particularly want to cling to my own existence; in fact, I feel empty of it much of the time, as if there is someone talking and doing various things, typing this right now, but “I” am not particularly identified with that being, and even the “I” that is observing its activities does not feel fundamental. The problem is that I, whatever I that means, directly experience a something in a human being, some irreducible spark behind all those characters in their shifting roles. That something exists in animals as well. At the core of all is an awareness. That is what’s home.

A long time ago I heard a talk by the Dalai Lama in which he was asked what the nature of consciousness really is. I remember him saying that it is a “luminous I.” Now I can’t find that quote anywhere, but I’ve found standard Buddhist references to consciousness as being “luminous and knowing.” Consciousness is the thing that illuminates, meaning that it lights its objects so that they can be apprehended, and it is the thing that knows, independent of what is known. At least, that is my best effort at understanding this. And the awareness that is found at the center of everyone is the same awareness that is found at the center of everyone else. This gets tougher to grasp. If one follows along through Phillips’ teachings, it becomes apparent that he too is talking about this universal awareness, not truly saying that there is no one home anywhere.

Universal awareness has found a staggering variety of ways to express itself, and I find that to be a tremendous joy. The “luminous I” is free to manifest as any physical appearance, any set of interests and talents, any gender or sexual orientation. The objective human mind sets limits, but in reality there are none.

 

*For those who have been living on Mars or who may read this in the future when these names have faded into history: Caitlynn Jenner is the name of the person who used to be the Olympic athlete Bruce Jenner before she transitioned. Rachel Dolezal is a white woman who changed her appearance and identified as black, and who led a chapter of the NAACP before she was outed as white by her parents.

**http://www.splcenter.org/blog/2015/06/26/string-of-nighttime-fires-hit-predominately-black-churches-in-four-southern-states/

+http://www.wordonfire.org/resources/article/bruce-jenner-the-shadow-council-and-st-irenaeus/4785/
Fr. Barron uses Jenner as a reason to attack his real target, Gnosticism, which he trashes viciously, and which he appears to understand poorly, as seen in his use of the term “the Gnostic heresy” at this late date. It seems, also, that he has more of an issue with dualism than with Gnosticism; he conflates the two, and this is misleading. But all that is a subject for another day and probably a very long post.

++ http://www.jp2.info/Theology_of_the_Body.pdf
Here is a summary of Pope John Paul II’s “theology of the body.”  I had not heard that term before, but I was all too familiar with his resistance to contraception and to any kind of sex outside of marriage (not to mention an equal role for women within the church).  I always admired John Paul II overall, but he went much further than I realized with these ideas, which seem to me to dismiss and denigrate the body’s biological needs just as Catholicism has done for centuries.  I am deeply saddened by words such as this:  “Therefore, in such a case, the conjugal act, deprived of its interior truth because it is artificially deprived of its procreative capacity, ceases also to be an act of love.” “If the procreative aspect of conjugal union is excluded, then that truth of the person and of the act itself is destroyed.”   There is no room at all for those who are anything other than heterosexual and monogamously married, nor even for those of us who have been sterilized for medical reasons or who have undergone hysterectomies!  This does not reflect the reality of nature on this planet.
  And for a celibate old man to suggest that since I had a tubal ligation in my late 20s, in all these years my husband and I have not experienced “an act of love,” is beyond offensive.  I am well and truly ready for a theology of love to replace this one.

3 Comments

Filed under human rights, nature, politics, spirituality

2D/4D, 8, and DADT

I originally started writing this in the summer of 2010, during the trial over repeal of California’s Proposition 8, which outlawed same-sex marriage in the state.  The wrangling over that has continued, and the hateful National Organization for Marriage that funded the whole thing has certainly not gone away.  Gay people still can’t get married in California.  Fights over marriage equality are gearing up in a number of states this year, and things may get better in some states and worse in others.  Here in New Mexico, so far, the influence of the Catholic Church has prevented us from getting even domestic partnerships for heterosexual couples, which seems like such a no-brainer, let alone same-sex marriage.

There is a bit more hope in the world now, though, since Congress has finally repealed “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell,” bringing us a little closer to the enlightenment level of the many other countries in which gay soldiers serve openly.  (Their militaries haven’t fallen apart, and ours won’t either.)  This was one of the few pieces of good news to come out of our sorry political system in quite a while.  My cheery feelings were tempered, though, when I saw a video clip of John McCain’s diatribe in response to the repeal vote.  The senator, you may remember, had doggedly stuck with DADT despite the contrary opinions of the Secretary of Defense and the bulk of the military leadership.  McCain was practically shaking with rage when he gave this speech.  And I was livid myself when he justified his stance by pointing out that we have soldiers in hospitals who have been maimed and lost limbs, implying that by some obscure mechanism this had been caused by the presence of their gay colleagues!  Apparently the idea was that you couldn’t trust a gay soldier in combat, not the way you could rely on a straight one, so you were more likely to take a hit from the enemy.  There was no perceptible shred of logic in his presentation.

As Jon Stewart pointed out, some of those hospitalized amputees are, guess what, gay themselves, and they might like to be able to have a visit from their significant other without having to pass him off as an old college buddy or something.

Here’s what I had written earlier:

A while back, a close friend gave some opinions and pronouncements that felt incredibly wrong to me and did not seem to be in line with her usual way of thinking.  She insisted that these ideas were what her Sources tell her, and since she is in touch with truly higher Sources, I am uncomfortable about arguing.  However, I need to bring up these issues.  She’ll probably read this, so I want to emphasize that I am writing with love and compassion.

What my friend said was that people who want to change their gender are not acting in accordance with natural law (please correct me if I’ve gotten this wrong).

She also had some harsh things to say about homosexual people, which gave me a thorough shock as it was so uncharacteristic of her.  She was talking about Those People as if they were some completely separate breed.  I pointed out that I was as much part of Those People as I was of her kind of people!  She insisted that for me to be bisexual is only a matter of being able to love in an unlimited way, whereas gay people are somehow a completely different matter.

Wait a second.  For good or ill, all you “monosexuals” out there, gay and straight, are pretty incomprehensible to me, and seem strangely limited.  But I understand that you were born that way and there’s nothing you can do about it.  And nothing you need to do about it.  You’re just fine the way you are.

My friend was saying that gay people are not just fine; what she said sounded perilously close to the so-called Christian view that God hates them and sees them as sinful.  Again, I know that my friend is not that kind of person at all.  I put in a lot of time trying to understand where she was coming from and how on earth she could say such hurtful things.

At the heart of this is a question about how much choice we have about who we are.  For the sake of argument, I will start with the point of view that says God made us who we are, and that His/Her creation is inherently good.  I will start there because this is how religious people generally seem to see the matter, and pretty much what my friend seems to believe as well.  I think there is an immediate logical conflict if we take this point of view and then say that people who have a particular gender identity or sexual orientation are somehow not in accordance with God and nature.  If God made us a certain way, how can that be wrong?  We would be acting against God’s wishes by trying to be something we are not, trying to fit in with someone’s false expectations of us.

We could also leave religion and spirituality out of this entirely, and simply look at what biology tells us.  There is evidence that gender identity has observable, biological correlations.  A person who has an internal sense of being female has a different biochemistry from one who has a sense of being male.  The outer form of the body doesn’t necessarily correspond to that internal sense.  That’s just how things are.

You may have heard of the “2D/4D ratio.”  This is an indirect measure of a person’s exposure to testosterone in utero.  Most men’s 4th fingers are longer than most women’s in relation to their 2nd fingers.  It can be shown that among a group of athletes, the one with the longest 4th finger is likely to win any type of sports competition.  It happens that I have quite long 4th fingers for a female, but sadly, they do not allow me to run faster, jump higher, or throw a ball faster than the next girl.  Far from it!  They do affect me quite a bit as an instrumentalist, however, and I’m very glad to have them, because my pinkies are teensy little things that can’t reach very far.  My 4th fingers can make up for that somewhat.  Does my 2D/4D ratio have anything to do with my sexual orientation?  Maybe*, but I know for sure that the relative lengths of my fingers, and whatever hormonal influences underlie that characteristic, are built in, and there’s nothing that can change them.

Should a person whose internal identity doesn’t match his or her body shape take medical or surgical steps to change into a more congruent physical form?  It’s not for me to say.  All I know is that by the time a person gets to the point of finding such drastic measures necessary, he or she has already suffered a lot and come to the conclusion that it’s impossible to live with that original outward form.  I haven’t experienced that, and I can’t judge a person who has.

One thing is certain– people who buck the norms of society are often punished for it.  Very often.

While mulling all this over, I finally got around to seeing the movie Boys Don’t Cry, the one about Teena Brandon, a girl who insisted she was a boy.  Her brutal murder was not entirely a matter of some idiot’s rage at her crossing of the gender line, but that had a great deal to do with it.  Teena (or rather Brandon, as she preferred to be called) paid the ultimate price for presenting herself as a member of the opposite sex.  Was she pretending to be something she wasn’t, or was she expressing what she truly was?

Personally, what I’d rather see is for all of us to realize that gender isn’t black and white, and that there are more than two.  Gender and gender identity (like sexual orientation) are fluid, and each person’s spot on the continuum can change to some extent.  Somebody please tell me why that has to be a problem!

I think there is an underlying difficulty with all of this: seeing the world as polarized in terms of gender.  I have noticed both gay and straight people doing that.  In fact, I’ve noticed gay people doing it more than straight people, perhaps because the way our society is constructed, they can’t afford to forget about gender issues for a moment.

There are real differences between the sexes, but the differences between individuals are greater than those between these two halves of humanity.  Diversity drives evolution.  Enjoy it.

*http://www.unl.edu/rhames/courses/readings/homofinger/homo_finger.html Apparently both homosexual women and homosexual men show evidence of having been exposed to a greater level of androgens before birth– both are hypermasculinized.  Not what you expected, huh?  Me neither, since it doesn’t seem to fit the way many gay men see themselves or the way others see them.  On, uh, the other hand, this source points out that the gender difference in fingers is relatively small: http://www.human-nature.com/nibbs/02/manning.html.

For current news on Proposition 8 and the fight for marriage equality in other states, check  http://stop8.org.

March 2012:  I just came across this article, which is notable for giving a small child’s perspective on her transgendered nanny, who she always “knew” was really a boy, even before she changed:  http://www.huffingtonpost.com/rhiana-maidenberg/transgender-nanny_b_1304328.html?ncid=webmail20

Here’s another eye-opening piece, about the challenges faced by transgender folk in Indonesia, one of whom was little Barry Obama’s nanny:  http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/03/05/evie-obamas-transgender-nanny-indonesia_n_1320927.html?ncid=wsc-huffpost-cards-headline

3 Comments

Filed under human rights